OJOS QUE NO VEN CORAZÓN QUE NO SIENTE – Juan Valbuena

book launch 21/11/2018 - 19:30

OUT OF SIGHT, OUT OF MIND
A visual project about the relationship between Spain and Equatorial Guinea

Idea, photos and texts: Juan Valbuena
Project implemented through the 2016 Leonardo Grant for Researchers and
Cultural Creators by the BBVA Foundation in the Journalism category.

www.ojosquenovencorazonquenosiente.org

The complex and unknown history between Spain and Equatorial Guinea has
left many of its figures in no man’s land, rendering them emotionally stateless
beings lost halfway between two worlds. It is hard for most of them to tell their
story and some, after doing so, would rather not give their names or show their
faces. Something similar has happened with the photographs, records and
documents: many have disappeared or are permanently damaged, and it has
not been easy to withstand the passing of time, the scourge of humanity or the
rigours of the climate.

This project aims to break the inertia of Classified Material: it seeks to give a
voice to and put a face on these people, to bring to light these records,
documents and family albums, and to photograph places and objects that, in
conjunction with them, help to speak of the unspoken, to see the unseen and to
feel what is not felt…

The OUT OF SIGHT, OUT OF MIND project exhibition is narrated
chronologically so as to reveal as much as possible about the historical
relationship between Spain and Equatorial Guinea. The full version of the

exhibition is divided into five periods, classified by colour, and comprises some
one hundred exhibit items of varied nature: pages from the project publication,
photographs and framed elements, wall texts and vinyl features, video screens
and showcases containing objects, images and documents.

The OUT OF SIGHT, OUT OF MIND project publication is composed of five
tabloid format newspapers, classified by colour, that tell some 240 years of
history untold in school books. In 120 pages, images and texts combine
information, opinions and emotions in an essay that explores the shared
borders between journalism, documentary photography and academic
research.